Huge Abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex

Deep beneath the plains of Deer Trail, Colorado lies a hidden system of tunnels that once housed instruments of nuclear annihilation.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The morning after my exploration of Southeastern Colorado's incredible ghost towns I woke early and drove to the remote town of Deer Trail, Colorado.  I wended my way to the site of the only Titan I Missile Silo still accessible to those bold enough to explore it.

It was a very cold morning with a biting wind, so I bundled up in several layers and ventured out. There are two entrances to the missile silo complex that do not require rope and repelling gear, and the easiest is a metal gate at the bottom of a large depression in the ground. The gate was welded shut long ago, but several bars have been removed by unknown adventurers to allow access.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Several discarded, bullet-ridden refrigerators lay nearby.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
Looking out the main entrance of the Titan I missile silo

Immediately inside the main entrance is a collection of tumbleweed and, because I visited in early March, snow and ice that had blown inside.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Surprisingly there was no indication that animals had sought shelter within the complex. The long dark passageways seemed an ideal refuge from the harsh Colorado winter, but something about the place seems to repel wildlife. I'm guessing it's the strong unnatural odor that hangs in the air, the result of chemicals, rust, and decay. I wore a fairly heavy-duty breathing mask, which kept my lungs safe, but the few times I took it off to adjust it, the strange industrial smell was pretty strong.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

I followed a corridor to an area where large pyramid-shaped structures hung from the ceiling.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Upon closer inspection I found a plaque indicating that they are dust collectors. Unfortunately it has been many years since they were operational, and there was quite a lot of dust in the air.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
Looking up a shaft leading to the surface

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
The bottom of the shaft was littered with old tires and other detritus

The first section I explored appeared to be an air intake/filtration facility, judging by the huge fans.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Massive pipes and hoses also occupied the area.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Below is a diagram of the typical layout of a Titan I launch complex, though it makes no mention of an air filtration facility.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Next I explored the Power House.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

It is absolutely gigantic. Due to the enormity of the chamber, I was not able to adequately photograph it because my flashlight and headlamp did not throw off nearly enough light to illuminate its cavernous extent. The Titan Missile Silo is a difficult place to photograph, not only because of the pitch darkness, but also the dust particles floating through the air tend to catch the light and interfere with focus.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
The Power House ceiling

I carefully walked out onto the catwalk along the upper portion of the power house. The mesh grates that used to cover the catwalk have mostly been removed, leaving huge gaps through which one could easily fall to the ground far below and end up severely injured or dead. I was careful to watch my footing as I walked along the thick metal beams.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Large hoses and connectors were scattered throughout the chamber.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The thick metal springs pictured below served as mounts for the generators that once occupied the power house.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Quite a bit of trash was scattered on the ground and a pile of ashes and charred beer cans marked the spot where someone had built a bonfire.

There were other strange pieces of equipment in various states of decay.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Double doors led into a corridor with many branches leading off from it.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

It also contained the charred remains of a couch. I have no idea how it ended up there. It must be an artifact from when the place was an active military installation because I can't imagine how someone could have gotten it through the narrow entrance to the complex.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
This black ghostly figure with white eyes appeared in several places throughout the complex. 

Just off the corridor is a tall room with a large elevator that was used to remove the last of the salvageable equipment from the site about 15 years ago. I climbed the stairs that wrapped around the outside of the shaft.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

At the top a broken set of stairs led up to a sealed door

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

with clever graffiti on it.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The wall was separating, allowing a draft to enter from outside.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Some of the corridors were extremely long. To give you a sense of how far they stretched, I stopped in the middle of this one and took a picture in both directions. No end in sight.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Eventually I reached a room where a hatch in the ceiling hung open and snowflakes drifted down from it.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

I looked up at the sunlight streaming down and considered climbing the ladder up to the surface, but without any idea of how stable the ladder was, I decided it wasn't worth the risk. I made a mental note to look for the shaft when I got back up to the surface, but I wasn't able to find it on the huge piece of land.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Many sections of the facility were flooded with water discolored by rust and chemicals. Most of the walkways were removed, leaving only metal beams, so I had to remain surefooted to avoid plunging into the icy water.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
A closeup of the conduits running through one of the walls beside a doorway

Each section of the complex had thick metal blast doors that weighed 3 tons apiece. The hinges of some were so rusty that they could barely be moved.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

There were three launcher areas, each marked with a little sign painted above the entrance.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Each had a corridor similar to the one pictured below, though not all were flooded. A sump pump was located in every launcher area, but without power they are useless.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Someone left an inflatable raft behind, probably from a time when the water level was much higher.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The moisture has caused every metal surface to rust over the years since the facility was abandoned.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The actual silos that housed the Titan rockets are enormous. Standing at the edge and looking down at the abyss below is a terrifying experience. It is at least a 50 foot drop to the contaminated water that has accumulated inside them, and probably extends another 100 feet to the floor of the silo. I can only imagine how horrible it would be to fall in.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
A platform along the wall inside a Titan I launcher fuel depot

Despite the darkness and massive size, I managed to get a picture of the blast doors, which weigh an astonishing 115 tons each.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The Titan I Missile was the US's first Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) stored in underground silos, and the first with a multistage propulsion system, which gave it greater range than Atlas missiles.

It is strange to walk through the dark, rusty corridors of the abandoned facility and think about the threat of nuclear annihilation that weighed upon the nation's conscience throughout the Cold War. The threat still hangs over our heads today, but people don't seem nearly as concerned.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

The Titan I Missile program was incredibly expensive and inefficient. Each Titan I launch complex cost $1.36 billion to build, adjusted for inflation, and only operated from 1962 to 1965, when they were made obsolete by the Titan II.

Titan I rockets had to be fueled up from the underground storage tank immediately prior to launch, then raised above ground on the enormous elevator system, leaving it exposed for some time before launch. The entire process took fifteen minutes, a slow reaction time compared to the Titan II, which used hypergolic propellants, which could be stored inside the missile.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

After deactivation, the Titan I missiles were scrapped or donated to museums. Most of the decommissioned ICBM silos were sold to private parties and have been repurposed or sealed off, but after more than fifty years, the Deer Trail site still remains abandoned.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
The top of an elevator shaft

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
The flooded floor of the above elevator shaft

After nearly four hours of exploring the incredible ruins of the Titan I launch complex, I emerged into the freezing Colorado air. The sight of my car filled me with relief; I half expected it to be towed away, or to find a police officer waiting for me to emerge, but this time I lucked out. 

I drove around the property to photograph the interesting above-ground structures. I could only snap a few shots before my fingers became too numb to work the camera and I had to retreat to the car to warm the feeling back into them.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
It was neat to look down at the platform below, where I had been standing hours earlier

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado

I cannot begin to tell you how thrilling it was to explore this incredible relic of the Cold War. I've never seen anything else like it. If you read my article about exploring Phoenix Trotting Park, you might remember that afterward I was shaking with excitement and the thrill of accomplishment. The way I felt after exploring the Titan was similar, but a thousand times more intense.

If you ever get the opportunity to check out the Titan I missile silo launch complex in Deer Trail, Colorado, I highly recommend you do it. But please realize that it can be extremely dangerous if you aren't careful. I would feel awful if anything bad happened to someone who decided to explore the Titan after reading this.

Be sure to bring at least one high-powered flashlight and a headlamp (for optimal photographic excellence, bring as much lighting as you can, and use a camera with a good low-light sensor). Please bear in mind that there are many places where you could easily fall a great distance or into icy polluted water, so watch your step and take your time. Also be aware that there is a lot of dust and some asbestos in the air. Be sure to wear a dust mask, or better yet, a breathing mask with filter cartridges.

One thing you don't need to worry about is radiation. The radioactive material in the Titan missiles was well contained and was removed with the missiles. I suppose there could be low levels of radon, but that is true of any underground structure, including your own basement!

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
An old soap dispenser.
I felt so grimy from exploring the abandoned missile silo, I definitely needed to wash up afterwards.

Urban exploration of abandoned Titan I ICBM Nuclear Missile Silo Launch Complex in Deer Trail, Colorado
Don't forget to wear a dust mask

I hope you all enjoyed my journey into the belly of the Titan. If you enjoyed it, feel free to share it on Facebook. While you're at it, please subscribe to Places That Were and follow me on my social media sites:

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Join me again next week to hear about my exploration of one of Colorado's abandoned sugar mills.

Thank you!

32 comments :

  1. Wow, I never realized how huge the Titan bases are! They are an absolute labyrinth/underground city compared to the Titan IIs. Great writeup and pictures, thanks for posting. Really enjoyed it!

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    1. Thank you! I was amazed at how long the tunnels were. I sure got my exercise exploring that place. You've been inside a Titan II silo? I haven't had the opportunity, but I'm hoping someday I will.

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  2. It does not surprise me that the ventilation system was not marked on the diagram. That appears to have been a drawing from the era that they were active and knowing where that system was would have been a very large security issue. Drop some gas down there or something much worse and there goes the crew.

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    1. That is a really good point. Thank you!

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  3. This:
    https://youtu.be/r7qliVpGEk0

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  4. Nice writeup, I haven't been to the Deer Trail site in years! Abandoned missile sites used to be something of a hobby of mine, and I had loads of info on them at one point.

    I would like to correct a couple things though: the silo doors did, in fact, weight approximately 115 tons each. They're concrete reinforced with ridiculously thick rebar, with steel plating on the underside. Each launcher had two doors on top. I used to be acquainted with Fred Epler, who was known for being kind of an expert on the Titan system: he had massive piles of documents, blueprints, everything you could imagine (sadly he passed away in 2013 of cancer, but he was a great guy and saved tons of related documentation from the landfill. A quirky mission in life, but he did it well!)

    Also, the "entrance" that you went in wasn't actually an entrance. You may have noticed the giant tank sitting aboveground: that used to be where the "entrance pit" is, decades ago. It was excavated for some reason, but nobody was sure if it was due to site salvaging after it had been decommissioned, or if a later property owner had done it (yes, that site is on private property. I got a trespassing ticket their about 18 years ago, and the court documents noted the owner's name and address. Not sure if he's still alive or not, but he was an old curmudgeon who was known for having some screws loose.) The sites were salvaged by the Air Force after they were decommissioned, although some salvage companies did a more graceful job than others. One site in Washington state had a giant hole cut in the power dome to remove the generators by crane; in the late 90's or early 2000's, a teenager died when he decided to rappel into that dome and somehow fell from his rope. Regardless, the Air Force never filled in any of the Titan I sites like they were supposed to: they simply salvaged any equipment they wanted to keep, and walked away. They did the same with most Atlas sites, although Titan II and deactivated Minuteman/Peacekeeper sites were dynamited to adhere to international arms reduction treaties.

    Lastly, the photo captioned "A platform along the wall inside a Titan I launcher silo" isn't actually a launch silo, it's a fuel terminal. The launch silo would be to through the tunnel on the right. The water in the fuel terminal is only a few feet deep, not that you'd want to fall in it. The silos themselves were bigger and MUCH deeper (launcher number 3 at Deer Trail is especially scary, because it's hardly flooded and you can look down about 100 feet...and there are no guard rails!)

    I'll also mention that the dust collector system was primarily meant for use IF there was a nearby nuclear detonation. It was meant to cyclonically separate out contaminated particles, so the base could be supplied with clean air even though it would've been completely sealed off to the rest of the world. Of course, that's based on the assumption the site wouldn't have just been tossed into the upper atmosphere by a Soviet warhead, which is probably the more likely scenario had SHTF. Having spoken with quite a few retired missile site personnel, most of them were well aware that they'd probably be vaporized in the event of a nuclear war, despite the military continually trying to sell the "surviving underground" thing.

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    1. You are incredibly knowledgeable! Thanks for all the info! I made a few corrections based on the information your provided.

      I took a ton of video while I was exploring the place. I need to edit and post it on youtube. After reading your comment, I watched the part where I get to launcher silo #3. It was so scary and exhilarating to stand at the edge of that huge drop. If I ever get a chance to visit again, I'm going to bring a lot more lighting so I can actually get a picture of the inside of the launcher silos. The flashlight I brought barely made a dent in the oppressive darkness of that huge space.

      Fred Epler sounds like an amazing person whom I wish I'd known. Has someone held onto the documents since his passing? It would be a shame to lose the fruits of his labor.

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  5. Great post! I absolutely love this place. I have been many times and know it by heart. Every time I visit, I am blown away and filled with wonder at the enormity of the location. Glad you could make it!

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    1. Thank you! I love this place too. I've only been the one time, but I'd love to go back. It's so awesome.

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  6. I would love to visit this place! Can anyone please give me coordinates to the entrance? Wondering if it would be safe to go at night

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    1. Send me a message on Google+, Instagram, or Facebook. I'll write you back with coordinates, advice and other info that might be of use.

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  7. Great stuff! (As always). One question, going into the TITAN or the PHX Trotting Park, do you go alone? I think the trotting park would be okay to explore alone but that's nuts to go into the TITAN alone. Looks very dangerous!

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    1. Thanks, Jake!

      I've had no choice but to go alone to most of the places I've explored. I'll admit it's pretty dangerous and nuts, but I've found it nearly impossible to convince anyone to come along with me. Most of the people I know are either too scared to go or have no interest.

      I take as many safety precautions as I can, and if anything terrible should ever happen to me, at least I'll have died doing what I love most.

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  8. Wow, what a historically interesting but seriously creepy place. All that rust and that graffiti of the white eyed creature. Frig I could never have done this alone! I was so surprised to see that some of the openings above ground haven't been sealed off for liability reasons. Great pictures and fantastic post.

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    1. It truly was one of the most interesting places I've explored so far. I wish I could have seen it before the control panels and other interesting artifacts were removed.

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  9. Thanks for this. It's been many years since exploring back in the early 80's when I was stationed at Buckley ANGB. Went there a few times to find there was still dated maintenance paperwork laying around. It's been so long I forgot where it was. I'll have to visit again sometime.

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    1. It must have been amazing to see in the 80s, before everything was removed. It was still very awesome when I was there, but abandoned places are always more interesting when artifacts are still lying around.

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  10. So did you get permission from the property owner? I've heard that many people who go in the silo without permission get prosecuted. Thanks.

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    1. You do need to get permission from the owner. I don't think it's accessible anymore though. I heard the owner got sick of trespassers and decided to close it up.

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    2. You can still get in as of July 2016. They sealed the ladder but you can get in through the large gated opening.

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    3. Good to know. I assumed incorrectly that they had sealed up the gated opening.

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  11. I went late in the summer of 2015 and there really weren't any "no trespassing" signs, the road was clear, and my group was perfectly fine. I tried to return about four months ago here in 2016, however, and the owner was patrolling his land with his dog. One of my friends talked to him, and he sounded really angry and said too many people were coming, along with some exaggerations. If you talk to the guy at the gas station, he will tell you too that people have indeed been arrested there, that it all started when the place first got posted online. Either somebody threw a ridiculous party there, someone got hurt and tried to sue, or the traffic really did just become unbearable. Needless to say, signs are posted everywhere now and the main road is blocked with metal debris. Sadly, this one is off-limits now. I was lucky to see it once, and was lucky I came the second time when he was already out, or I'd have a mark on my record now.

    By the way, fantastic walkthrough. I didn't explore to this depth and wish I had, but I can explore vicariously :)

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    1. Thanks for commenting. It's a shame the place has become off-limits. I'd hoped to go back one day, but it seems like that's no longer a possibility. I'm glad we got to see it before it was too late.

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    2. I guess I will chime in, Someone that knew the owner posted to my YouTube channel bitching how it's trespassing, I mentioned that there was No Signs, No Fence, no nothing to say otherwise. I assumed it was State Land maybe even federal. The man got all huffy at me, and I deleted his post and banned him. I don't want trouble and he seemed like he just wanted to argue. Not sure why people keep the location secret I found it in 2 minutes on Google...and a list and location of all the sites in many states. Anyways, about a month or two after my heated discussion with the man signs went up, blocked entrance, and everything I addresses was done. I do wonder if any of the other sites have a way in, worst case repeal in through the ventilation shaft...unlikely the blast doors for the ventilation are closed...most were missing in the DearTrail complex. Just a thought of a way into the others. ;-)

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    3. I just happened to check back on this thread today. Yeah, that guy from the gas station said there are definitely other silos around, but he said they are likely to be far more tightly locked down (this one was opened up for environmental cleaning or something like that). Also, people have been visiting it for decades...until now.

      Yeah, you'd probably have to recruit a friend to do a night drop-off and coordinate the pick-up. He's not going to scour the insides for people, he probably just checks for cars then calls the police. It is his property though and he has a right to not want people on it. Besides, the greater the length you go to get in, the less credible your defense will be if you do get caught.

      It's a shame. I'd gladly sign a waiver and drop $100 to go back. He could really make some money from that place. And then people could go legally. Win-win, right?

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  12. I assume it's completely cut off now?

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  13. I believe it has been completely closed at this point. The local news ran a story about how he was blocking all of the available openings to prevent folks from entering the complex. He is quoted as being concerned about the potential for liability and technically he would be liable since it is foreseeable that someone would trespass to visit the complex which has many identified potential dangers and could likely be injured. He is liable since he is the possessor of the property and he is aware of the dangers and had previously not remedied the situation by closing the opening and preventing harm to trespassers or any type of visitor. On a different note, the Titan Missile museum outside Tucson is amazing and a fully intact missile complex that is open to the public. If you are passing through I highly recommend you visit the museum, it apparently looks the same as when it was still active from the 60's to the mid 80's.

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  14. I was stationed at "5B" in the mid 60's. Pictures brought back a lot of memories. Worked in the powerhouse.

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    1. That must have been an incredibly interesting place to work. I bet you have some great stories from you time there.

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    2. Pictures are great! I referenced photos like yours for my fiction novel The Last Of The Titans. It centers around a 1960s era Titan 1 site and missile which was buried and then reactivated decades later. I would love to explore one of these sites but I'd probably end up at the bottom of a shaft! I think I'll visit the Arizona Titan museum instead.

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    3. What a great idea for a novel. Have you published it yet? I need to go to the Titan museum one of these days. I've heard it's amazing.

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