Abandoned Places in Antimony and Junction, Utah Ghost Towns

Unique abandoned buildings in Antimony and Junction, Utah serve as reminders of the frontiersmen and miners who ventured westward in the late 1800s in search of opportunity.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

After exploring the awesome abandoned Osiris Creamery and Granary, I set my sights on an abandoned military base several hours east. I had another long drive ahead of me, but I didn't mind. It was a beautiful day and I couldn't get enough of the gorgeous scenery. Being behind the wheel on a long stretch of country road with not another soul for miles is an incredibly liberating feeling.

As I drove through the town of Antimony I spotted an interesting structure that looked like it had been built into the hillside. I pulled off the road for what would be the first of many unplanned stops.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

The structure was quite different from most I'd seen before. It had sloping walls and a flat ceiling. I'm not sure why it was built that way, but there must be a good reason. I came across a handful of others with the same architecture.

I figure the shape might have something to do with wind resistance. The area experiences high winds, which caused a lot of trouble for early settlers. Structures that blended into hillsides might have proven an effective solution.

The building was in pretty bad shape. Much of the ceiling had caved in.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

Quite a few artifacts remained inside, but I could only guess at what they were. If you have any info, please leave a comment at the end of the article.

Antimony and other towns in the region have experienced mining booms since the 1860s, and I suspect this building was used as part of a mining operation. 

The equipment pictured below looks like it might have been used for separating ore. 

[Edit: Thanks for everyone who commented here and on my Facebook page. The consensus seems to be that these buildings and equipment were used for sorting, packaging, and storing potatoes, which were a major crop in the area. The roofs were covered in earth to insulate the buildings and better preserve the potato crops.]

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

There were several old washing machines.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

And some other equipment that might have been used for storing or separating mined ore [edit: or potatoes].

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

A few miles down the road I came to another building of the same style. 

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Some of the equipment inside was similar to what I'd seen inside the first building. 

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

In Junction, Utah I stopped to take a look at an abandoned gas station.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

I was surprised to find that one of the garage doors was open.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Several vehicles were parked in the corner of the lot. I was tempted to get a closer look until an unseen dog started viciously barking. I figured the property's caretaker might be living in the little trailer, so I didn't stick around.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

Across the street was another of the sloping buildings, but in much worse condition than the others I'd seen.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

Most of it the equipment had been cleared out. One piece still sat outside.

Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction UT ghost towns

Piute and Garfield County are home to many ghost towns and very old abandoned buildings. I could easily have spent the rest of the day exploring the area, but I was eager to continue my journey to the Rust Belt.

Before I left the area, I made one more stop in the town of Circleville, which I'll tell you about next week.

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Abandoned places in Antimony and Junction Utah ghost towns

13 comments :

  1. A great find. I can imagine the winds must have somehow had something to do with the way the buildings were constructed. And that double washer--so cool . Yea-I'm weird like that--haha. Though I'd plant it up with flowers!!
    Have a great week

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Old appliances are so neat! I could sure use a double washer (preferably something a little more modern and energy efficient). I tend to let all my laundry pile up until I've got almost a half dozen loads that need to be washed.

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  2. Dasil Mathews - my father-in-law was born and raised in Antimony. Utah. He is now 96 years young. I will see if i can get him to come on the sight and recognize any of this.....

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  3. I always thought those were old potato cellars or crop cellars used by farmers!!

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    Replies
    1. I was guessing they had something to do with mining, but it looks like I was mistaken.

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  4. These long, partially dug out buildings are what is left of the many potato cellars found in the area. In the mid 1900s, potatos were the major cash crop in Piute County. Potatos were harvested, then stored in the dark, cool buildings, until sold.

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  5. Very cool pictures. I was raised in Angle, a small town at the north end of Otter Creek Resivour. Each school day and to church on various days I would travel to Antimony. Many of the pictures you have posted are ingrained in my memory. Yes, indeed, the cellars you have captured are abandoned potato storage and processing facilities. The machinery you picture are the potato sorting and cutting stations that were used. I actually worked at these when in my youth. Keep up the excellent photography!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for sharing your memories. It's great to hear from someone who lived in the area and worked in those buildings. I'm glad you like the pictures I took. Next time I'm around, I'll be sure to visit Angle.

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  6. Sorry about the above post. Forgot to identify myself.

    Scott Jolley

    ReplyDelete