Awesome Abandoned Osiris Creamery and Granary in Utah Ghost Town

Deep in the Black Canyon of rural Utah lies the abandoned Osiris Creamery and Granary, a towering remnant of the ghost town of Osiris.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

I woke at sunup on day 2 of my Epic Rust Belt Road Trip. Having spent the previous day visiting an abandoned hospitalairport, and pet cemetery, I could hardly wait to get back on the road for another day of exploration.

I wended my way through the rolling hills of central Utah, awestruck by the scenery. I'd fallen in love with Utah's beautiful rock formations on my previous road trip, and now I was enjoying a whole new side of the state that I hadn't seen before.

About 8 miles south of Antimony, along a winding country road, I came to the magnificent towering structure of Osiris Creamery and Granary.

[Note: Osiris Creamery is on private property and must not be accessed without permission from the owner]

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


The granary portion of the building was relatively clean and free of debris. Its thick wooden beams had held up well in the century since it had been built. The stairs and flooring were mostly in solid shape, so I felt safe exploring every level.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


I did have to watch my step though, because there were a few sizable holes in the floor.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


No equipment remained inside, but there were quite a few chutes and other inner workings that gave an idea of how the place might have functioned back in its day.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

The top story is a narrow room with windows all around. 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

The view of the surrounding countryside was spectacular.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

I also had a good view of the rusty equipment that remained in the ruins of the adjoining creamery. 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

I peered down through holes in the floor to the vast emptiness of the silos below.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Then I carefully edged out onto the roof.  

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

At the apex was a collapsing wooden tower that I dared not enter.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

I descended to the basement and got a look at the silos from ground level. 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Behind the property a sprawling field of dense brush is kept at bay by a cyclone fence, leaving a narrow yard that seemed like a perfect spot for a picnic.  

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Stringy plant life flows through a basement window frame. 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

I gazed up at the empty windows above. 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

In the back corner of the property sits a decrepit little shack with an old stove rusting behind it. 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

The inner walls of the little shack are very weathered and covered in markings left by years of visitors. On the ceiling in the picture below, you can see that someone has carved "Jim S." I promise I'm not the culprit; I adhere to a strict "leave no trace" policy.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Next to the granary building sits the neat little stone ruin of the original creamery.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

The ceiling is completely gone. A layer of flaking white paint remains on a few of the stone and mortar walls.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


A few sun-bleached wooden beams stand amid the thick weeds that blanket the floor.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


The creamery still contains one notable piece of equipment.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


A constant stream of water flows from a large metal tank. The sound is incredibly peaceful.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


The water passes beneath the stone wall, 

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

and is guided though a man-made channel

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

to form a stream behind the property.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town

Osiris was settled in 1910, along the east fork of the Sevier River near what is now Bryce Canyon National Park. The town was originally called Henderson after William James Henderson, a shepherd from Panguitch, who donated the land.

Later, W. E. Holt arrived from the nearby town of Widtsoe. He and his family built a house and a creamery. The grain mill and massive silos were added later. For unknown reasons, Holt renamed the town Osiris, after the Egyptian god of the afterlife.

The ruins of the Holt family home still remain across the street from the creamery.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


The brambles were thick and impassible and I hadn't brought a machete, so I was unable to get a closer look.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


Harsh weather and and insufficient water made farming prohibitively difficult. After a decade of struggle, the Holt family abandoned the settlement in the 1920s.

Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


The Osiris Creamery and Granary was an awesome way to start the morning, but the day had plenty more incredible places in store for me. Come back next week for pictures and stories from the ghost towns of Antimony and Junction, Utah

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Osiris Creamery and Granary Abandoned in Utah Ghost Town


10 comments :

  1. Another nice "find", Jim. Love that top room--what a great view that must have been.
    I've been to all the national parks in Utah (stunning, stunning!!!), but have never really explored the old places. Guess the Bucket List grows yet again-LOL!
    Have a great weekend

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    Replies
    1. Always glad to add more ideas for your bucket list :)
      I have only been to Arches National Park and Dead Horse Point State Park. Both were phenomenal.

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  2. Osiris was never Henderson. It was named by Grace Holt, during it's construction in 1922. The property is owned by the BLM and is on the National Register. It is fenced and posted no trespassing for that reason. My Mother was raised on this property. Her father was the manager of the mill and creamery.

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  3. My uncle worked in that creamery, he told me a story yrs ago about having to remove part of the roof so they could bring in a piece of equipment. He lived in that house that across the street from the mill. Great place to fish and get away from the world.

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    Replies
    1. How neat. Thank you for posting. It really is a beautiful peaceful place. The rest of the world and all its complications feel so far away when you're there.

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  4. I looked at some of your "incredible finds" lol. I was thinking the whole time, that you were alone, and going to these desolate places. Weren't you afraid of mountain lions, vagrants, Meth heads, etc? I enjoyed your writings and photos.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you. I was a little concerned at first so I made sure I was prepared to defend myself. Considering how many places I've explored it's surprising how few times I've run into other people.

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  5. That "Water Tank" is a small turbine, by the looks of it. Cool find, really cool.

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  6. Be very aware trekking and fishing around this canyon, the rattlesnakes are abundant.

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